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Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager's Zoom Meeting - Shared screen with speaker view
Martha P., Falmouth Schools, she/her/hers
39:49
School kitchens are great sources of cardboard boxes!
Jessica Puzak
40:14
Yes Martha is right, I have a million boxes a day come through the kitchen
Samantha Cottone (she/her/hers)
40:37
That’s a great tip!
Malia she/her/ FoodCorps
47:15
Love the cafeteria idea! I’ll also say that for bigger path sized cardboard I’ve had luck going right to the transfer station — they’d let me choose from a huge pile of already broken down huge pieces of cardboard
Jessica Puzak
49:00
love this
Martha P., Falmouth Schools, she/her/hers
49:45
Ryan this is a great video!
Malia she/her/ FoodCorps
49:48
I feel like I’m in the garden with you and Marv (:
jstork
54:05
What was the combination of materials that you were putting on the cardboard as you mentioned grass which I thought we were trying to get rid of grass? Leaves are great
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
54:49
Grass clippings. They are wonderful.
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
55:09
Harder to get in a school garden because most of our schools contract mowing and they don’t want to mess with bagging and emptying.
Willie Grenier
55:44
Leaves can work too.
Malia she/her/ FoodCorps
55:54
The town of Belfast will come and drop off a big load of leaves at the school to use as mulch — could be worth calling public works!
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
56:04
Leaves are great and if you have a place to store them you also have a great activity for your kiddos to do each fall. Shredded leaves are preferable to whole because the increased surface area blocks more light and reduces the ability of wind to blow them away.
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
56:35
To shred leaves you can either use a chipper shredder, or pile them in one big pile and tell the kids to stay out of the pile and then turn your back. You’ll have shredded leaves in an hour.
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
57:57
Yarrow? That’s cool!
Jessica Puzak
58:13
Nice video Rachel :)
Britt Layman
58:17
What a beautiful space!!
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
58:52
As you can see in Rachel’s garden they use a lot of wood chips. That is something we can often get a lot of and that is a great mulch and does great covering cardboard.
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:03:50
Churches, senior groups, veterans groups, eagles clubs, boy and Girl Scouts.
Laura Hoeft
01:05:33
regarding the wood chips: are pine ok or too acidic?
Britt Layman
01:05:50
Girls Scouts are the best! Swarmed the garden in the fall for clean up and it was done in a snap!
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:06:01
Pine is great. Just make sure wood chips are spread on top of the ground. Not tilled in.
Laura Hoeft
01:06:13
ok thanks
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:06:27
Type of wood doesn’t really matter as long as it’s treated. Certain woods last longer. Cedar is rot resistant for example.
Laura Hoeft
01:06:40
I have a huge pine resource from a local biz
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:06:50
They are your new best friends!
Martha P., Falmouth Schools, she/her/hers
01:11:41
How do we connect with Americorps?
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:12:25
The people in your community who are most committed to your school are those that are most committed to your students. Parents, grandparents, guardians. They also receive your school newsletters! Rachel is so right! They want to help!
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:12:30
https://volunteermaine.gov/
Jessica Puzak
01:12:34
I have to run, great job everybody
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:13:32
That link is to the Maine Commission for Community Service which runs the network of Americorps service members and organizations. https://volunteermaine.gov/
Martha P., Falmouth Schools, she/her/hers
01:14:29
Thank you.
Marie Wendt (Pownal)
01:14:30
My personal experience with thick mulch results in encouraging mice, voles etc tunnels / nests - and then also ticks. How do folks deal with these challenges?
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:15:43
Wood chips are good if you have voles. They don’t like the sharp edges.
Samantha Cottone (she/her/hers)
01:17:39
These are fantastic ideas, Rachel!
Martha P., Falmouth Schools, she/her/hers
01:18:06
Master Gardeners program.
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:18:31
Also, here is a video that shows you some homemade vole traps that work well and are fairly safe to use because the trap itself is hidden inside a box. https://youtu.be/UxECE-h_b6w the vole discussion begins at around 6 minutes.
Martha P., Falmouth Schools, she/her/hers
01:19:11
High school students who need community service hours.
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:19:13
All high school students have community service requirements for graduation. Talk to your high school principals.
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:19:22
Like minds Martha!
Martha P., Falmouth Schools, she/her/hers
01:19:38
Indeed Ryan.
Meghan Butler, Ridgeview Community School Garden
01:19:45
We have the Tri-County Technical Center and I imagine the high school students there could help with projects. Carpentry, etc.
Martha P., Falmouth Schools, she/her/hers
01:20:09
How about jails and prisons?
Britt Layman
01:20:11
I usually get National Honor Society students who are scrambling to get hours in at the end of the year. They are great at planting and weeding!
Marie Wendt (Pownal)
01:22:37
COVID? How is everyone dealing with volunteers coming to school property - enforcing safety / health guidelines. Pandemic complications in doing all of this?
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:25:47
This is definitely the time to have conversations with your administration about volunteers. Be clear with your volunteers about safety protocols, where things are, where they go when done (tools, hoses, etc.). With the lifting of mask mandates in outdoor settings and recent CDC guidance about risk of transmission outside, this is a good time to bring up volunteers. Keep your groups small for now.
Britt Layman
01:26:44
As the volunteering is outside it isn’t a concern for us. People are attending outside athletic events so I a comfortable with a few volunteers. Just have your expectations clear. Masking if physical distancing isn’t possible and not coming if ill.
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:27:58
You can also manage more intensively. Instead of having everyone come in at once, you can get volunteers to pick specific days that they adopt and then ensure they are the only ones in the garden for that day and time. Keep those within family units for instance. Also, be clear with what you want them to do, where they can go, and what they can’t do. Also, Rachel’s idea of a whiteboard in the shed or some way for them to connect with you as the manager is great.
jstork
01:28:53
Will you make available this chat log and the videos that we have seen and of course the video of this whole meeting? So much great information!!
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:29:05
Yup!
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:29:22
Once I get the transcript and recording link I will share with all participants.
Meghan Butler, Ridgeview Community School Garden
01:29:28
Great tips Rachel! Thanks!
Martha P., Falmouth Schools, she/her/hers
01:29:35
Great ideas and suggestions Rachel!
Marie Wendt (Pownal)
01:29:59
Thanks for your replies - I’m not good at listening and chatting at the same time - so I will read late (saving the chat)
Amanda Junkins
01:30:34
Transportation
Darcy Johnston
01:30:36
gasoline
Meghan Butler, Ridgeview Community School Garden
01:30:38
tires
Laura Hoeft
01:30:41
dirty
Meghan Butler, Ridgeview Community School Garden
01:30:49
roadtrip
jstork
01:30:55
speed
Rachel Solomon
01:31:02
music
Britt Layman
01:31:02
payment
Samantha Cottone (she/her/hers)
01:31:04
I also thought tires. Gets you to where you’re going, so useful
Laura Hoeft
01:31:07
in it a lot!
Nini Christensen
01:31:08
shelter from weather
Marie Wendt (Pownal)
01:31:15
gas
Darcy Johnston
01:31:30
hungry
Rachel Solomon
01:31:30
pb&j
Meghan Butler, Ridgeview Community School Garden
01:31:31
hungry
Laura Hoeft
01:31:33
midday
Amanda Junkins
01:31:33
School
Samantha Cottone (she/her/hers)
01:31:34
nutrition
Marie Wendt (Pownal)
01:31:35
sandwich
jstork
01:31:41
salad
Marie Wendt (Pownal)
01:31:44
cafeteria
Rachel Solomon
01:31:59
carrots!
Samantha Cottone (she/her/hers)
01:31:59
Plant parts
Meghan Butler, Ridgeview Community School Garden
01:32:00
leaves
jstork
01:32:02
family
Darcy Johnston
01:32:03
absorb
Laura Hoeft
01:32:06
foudation
Amanda Junkins
01:32:13
Dandelions
Meghan Butler, Ridgeview Community School Garden
01:32:20
soil
Laura Hoeft
01:32:30
ugh
Samantha Cottone (she/her/hers)
01:32:35
Organize
Marie Wendt (Pownal)
01:32:36
days
Darcy Johnston
01:32:36
schedule
Meghan Butler, Ridgeview Community School Garden
01:32:36
schedule
Marie Wendt (Pownal)
01:32:38
years
Laura Hoeft
01:32:40
too busy
Amanda Junkins
01:32:40
Meetings
Catherine Reuter
01:32:42
months
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:32:44
annoying
jstork
01:32:50
constant companion
Rachel Solomon
01:32:52
late
Meghan Butler, Ridgeview Community School Garden
01:32:54
commitment
Amanda Junkins
01:32:54
Birthdays
Britt Layman
01:32:59
29 more days of school! For this year….
Laura Hoeft
01:33:04
life managment
Willie Grenier
01:33:12
months
Samantha Cottone (she/her/hers)
01:33:17
reminders
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:34:53
Tires hold down things in the garden and can make raised beds
Darcy Johnston
01:35:15
organize garden meetings over lunch in the garden
Laura Hoeft
01:36:04
kids summer playdate in the playground while parents tend
Meghan Butler, Ridgeview Community School Garden
01:36:09
Offer that people can take CARROTS home when they've made time in their SCHEDULES to help out
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:36:46
You can have an entire day about leaves. If your car is dirty you might as well use it to bring leaves to the garden for mulching, and you can provide a salad for volunteers. Salads have leaves. See what I did there?!
Laura Hoeft
01:36:47
offer any volunteers to take ANYTHING home while they help if its ready
Darcy Johnston
01:37:06
Thanks so much! I have to head off a little early.
Malia she/her/ FoodCorps
01:37:39
https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1HqzbjDcVy-CFKvqDXCxzCpeWT5e5n7nHjEYtP92ECAI/edit#slide=id.gd134b58e72_0_0
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:39:18
That’s brilliant!
Ryan Parker, He Series Pronouns, FoodCorps Maine Program Manager
01:42:52
For those who have to hop off right at 10:30, I’ll be sure to send out the saved chat, and the link to our recording to all of you. Thank you so much for joining us. We hope to see you next month!
Martha P., Falmouth Schools, she/her/hers
01:43:33
Thank you MSGN and this great School Garden Day/morning!
Marie Wendt (Pownal)
01:44:05
Thanks all - this has been very inspiring.
jstork
01:44:14
This has been great. Thank you and see you in June. Have a wonderful weekend
Amanda Junkins
01:44:15
Great information. Thank you all so much.
Meghan Butler, Ridgeview Community School Garden
01:44:16
Thanks everyone, I've got lots of ideas to take back to my group.
Nini Christensen
01:44:24
Thank you for offering this. Very informative.
Laura Hoeft
01:44:40
Thanks a bunch! So glad I discovered this :)
Willie Grenier
01:44:44
Well done all!
Malia she/her/ FoodCorps
01:44:44
malia.demers@foodcorps.org if you want to contact me!